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Academics

Academic Courses

There are a variety of courses in which LGBTQ* topics are included and/or explored to varying degrees of depth. Below you will find a list of credit bearing academic courses currently available. To suggest additions to this list or to make any corrections please contact lgbtqservices@stonybrook.edu. All courses available are listed in the Stony Brook Undergraduate Bulletin's Course Descriptions index.

 

AAS 222: Indian Cinemas and Cultures

The course examines the contemporary global art form known as 'Indian cinemas' from its advent of the moving picture in the late 1800's to the present. In this Asian film course, we explore the various cinemas of India and the Indian diaspora such as Bollywood cinema, art cinema, films by Indian directors inside and outside India, music videos, and documentaries. Factors behind its ascent to the most popular art form as well as a lucrative medium of entertainment and potent vehicle for social change not only in India but also beyond its shores are examined in some depth. We discover how these various Indian cinemas address and depict the social mores, cultural practices and political issues of the South Asian subcontinent. Themes for our discussions include but are not limited to nationalism, sexuality, censorship, activism, tradition, modernity, identity, gender roles, and the pleasures and politics of song, dance and music, as we look at historical, thematic and aesthetic issues of these cinemas and their impact and influence in India as well as globally.
DEC: D
SBC: ARTS, GLO
3 credits

 

AAS 328: Race, Humor and Asian America

This comparative ethnic American cultures course examines how contemporary American comedians, fiction writers, visual artists, independent filmmakers, feminist and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life such as racism, immigration, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will explore how the ends of comedy are more than laughter and how comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status and one 100- level or higher AAS, AMR, EGL, or CLT course
DEC: K
SBC: HFA+, USA
3 credits

 

AAS 336: Asian and Pacific Islanders in American History

Asian and Pacific Islanders in American History is an examination of the historical factors that have molded Asian and Pacific Islander life in the United States. Strongly emphasized themes include imperialism/ colonialism, immigration, gender/sexuality, second generation, and images/mass media. This course is offered as both AAS 336 and HIS 338.
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status
DEC: K & 4
SBC: SBS+
3 credits
 

AFH 379: Philosophy of Race (III)

Examination of our assumptions about race and the impact of those assumptions on issues concerning gender, class, and sexuality throughout American history. Readings include critical race theory, feminist theory, and critical legal theory. Students examine racial issues from a philosophical perspective and consider the ways in which representations of race may reinforce patterns of power and privilege. This course is offered as both AFH 379 and PHI 379.
Prerequisite: one PHI course
DEC: K
SBC: CER, HFA+, USA
3 credits

 

AFH 382: Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora

Black women's literature presents students with the opportunity to examine through literature the political, social, and historical experiences of Black women from the African Diaspora. The course is structured around five major themes commonly addressed in Black women's writing: Black female oppression, sexual politics of Black womanhood, Black female sexuality, Black male/female relationships, and Black women and defining self. This course is offered as AFH 382, EGL 382, and WST 382.
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

 

AFS 373: Sexualities: African and Caribbean Perspectives

Designed to introduce students to the complexities of human sexuality from a perspective that places subaltern individuals at the center of the analysis. It locates these individuals, and their sexual practices, in the tropics--or "warm, warm climates"--first in those man-made communities where sexuality was one of the (unspoken) exigencies of the slave economy and later in the modern era where the slave economy gave way to "neocolonies."
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
DEC: J
SBC: SBS+
3 credits

 

CLL 315: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greek Literature

This course offers a comparative overview of the ways in which the roles of men and women were depicted in the literature and thought of ancient Greece. Major issues will include: the shift from matriarchal to patriarchal pantheons, sanctioned and unsanctioned homoeroticism, the sorceress and the hysteric as dominant tropes in the mythology of the period, and the role of women in the polis, among others. This course is offered as both CLL 315 and WST 315.
Prerequisite: one D.E.C. G or HUM course
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

 

CLT 123: Sexuality in Literature

An exploration of the expression and interpretation of sexual experience in literature and culture, through discussion of selections from world literature and art, both classic and contemporary. Themes include temptation and gratification, desire and fulfillment, and how societies shape gender roles and deviance and set limits on sexual representation in literature and art.
DEC: B
SBC: CER, HUM
3 credits

 

EHI 340: Ecological and Social Dimensions of Disease

The ecology and evolutionary biology of disease will be examined to provide a more general context for human diseases. Pathogens may have large effects on many different types of organisms, from bacteria to plants to humans. We will build on this biological background to examine the social dimensions of disease in human populations and societies, including historical, political and economic aspects to issues of money, power, sexuality, international development and globalization. Specific case studies (the chestnut blight in North America, AIDS in Africa, etc.) will be used to examine concepts and principles in detail in a real-world context. This course will investigate basic fundamentals and recent research on these issues in a unified framework.
Prerequisite: BlO 201
DEC: H
SBC: STAS
3 credits

 

HIS 115: American Women's History to 1900

Introduces the major themes and debates in the history of women and gender in the United States from the Age of Revolution to the turn of the Twentieth Century. It explores women's unique experience, ideas, and activities, while cultivating a mindfulness of the extraordinary diversity that has always characterized American women. Topics include women experience of invasion, colonization, political revolution, constitutional law, the sexual division of labor, gender norms, sexuality, slavery, immigration, crime, conduct, social reform, education, and culture.
DEC: K & 4
SBC: SBS, USA
3 credits
 

HIS 116: American Women's History Since 1900

Surveys the history of women and gender in the United States from 1900 to the present. The course focuses on three kinds of changes: in women's work and the gendered division of labor; in relationships between gender, politics, and the state; and the rise of consumer and mass cultures. Students will read what historians and other scholars have written about women and analyze historians' sources in the form of documents and images. We will pay particular attention to differences among women in such areas as race and ethnicity, class, religion, and sexuality. Students should acquire a deeper understanding of the forces influencing women's lives and gender norms and a better appreciation of how women and gender have shaped the history of the United States.
DEC: K & 4
SBC: SBS, USA
3 credits

 

HIS 229: Victorian Britain

This course explains the social, cultural and political history of Britain in the nineteenth century. It pays particular attention to the impact of empire, industrialization and major constitutional reform and revolution on domestic politics, social attitudes and intellectual and cultural life in Britain. Topics to be explored include industrialization and class; Reform Acts; the gospel of work; the condition of England question; urban anthropology and the discovery of poverty; the cult of true womanhood, feminism and the public sphere; the impact of the Indian Mutiny of 1857; Africa and the Victorians; the regime of sexuality; Jack the Ripper and the others within. We explore these issues through lectures, reading, films, discussion exams and essays. Formerly offered as HIS 305. Not for credit in addition to HIS 305.
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 102
DEC: I
SBC: GLO, SBS
3 credits

 

HIS 378: War and the Military

The causes and origins of wars, and the impact of war on social change, considered in the context of various wars and battles. Topics covered include issues of military organization, recruitment, training, morale, war planning, and the integration of women, gays, and minorities in the military. This course is offered as both HIS 378 and SOC 378. Prerequisite: One HIS course or SOC 105
DEC: F
SBC: SBS+
3 credits
 

PSY 347: Psychology of Women

The psychological impact of important physiological and sociological events and epochs in the lives of women; menstruation, female sexuality, marriage, childbirth, and menopause; women and mental health, mental illness and psychotherapy; the role of women in the field of psychology. This course is offered as both PSY 347 and WST 377. Prerequisite: WST major or minor; or one of the following: WST 102, WST 103, PSY 103, WST/SOC 247
DEC: F
SBC: SBS+
3 credits

 

SOC 204: Intimate Relationships

The dynamics of forming, maintaining, and dissolving intimate relationships. Attention is focused on dating, partner selection, sexuality, marriage, divorce, and remarriage.
DEC: F
SBC: SBS
3 credits

 

SOC 393: Special Topics in Health, Medicine, and Social Change

Selected topics in health, medicine, and in social change. Topics may include the Sociology of Aging, Sociology of Sexuality, Healthcare Delivery, and the Sociology of Disability. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within social sciences disciplines. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, and knowledge of the major concepts, models, and issues of the discipline. May be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisites: SOC 105; U3 or U4 standing
DEC: F
SBC: SBS+
3 credits

 

WST 111: Introduction to Queer Studies in the Humanities

A survey of historical representations of queer difference from the late 19th century to the present. Works of visual art, literary representations and poetry are examined as evidence of the shifting understanding of lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgendered/queer identity.
DEC: G
SBC: HUM
3 credits

 

 

WST 112: Introduction to Queer Studies in the Social Sciences

An introduction to the field of queer studies from the perspectives of the social and behavioral sciences. Themes include the construction of sexual and political difference, heterosexism and the nature of oppression, race/class/gender and sexuality, psychological theories of sexuality, and historical roots of these issues.
DEC: F
SBC: SBS
3 credits

 

WST 291: Introduction to Feminist Theory

An introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women's and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women's and Gender Studies.
Prerequisite: WST 102 or WST 103
DEC: G
SBC: ESI, HFA+
3 credits

 

WST 374: Historical Perspectives on Gender Orientation

An examination of contemporary American gender orientation from an historical perspective. Topics include gay marriage, gay clergy, medical definitions of gender orientation and gays in the military.
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
Advisory Prerequisites: One HIS or WST course
DEC: F
SBC: SBS+
3 credits

 

WST 390: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies in the Humanities

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of specific current topics in women's and gender studies within humanities disciplines such as literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy. Past topics include World Women Writers, Music and Sexuality, Contemporary Memoirs, and Alice Walker. May be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: WST major or minor, or WST 102 (formerly SSI/WST 102), or WST 103, or WST 301, or WST/PHI 284, or 6 credits of departmentally approved courses
Advisory prerequisites: may be announced with topic
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

 

WST 391: Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies in the Humanities

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of specific current topics in women's and gender studies within humanities disciplines such as literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy. Past topics include World Women Writers, Music and Sexuality, Contemporary Memoirs, and Alice Walker. May be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: WST major or minor, or WST 102 (formerly SSI/WST 102), or WST 103, or WST 301, or WST/PHI 284, or 6 credits of departmentally approved courses
Advisory prerequisites: may be announced with topic
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

 

WST 399: Topics in Gender and Sexuality

Past topics have included titles such as Sexual Citizens and Queer Theory. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: WST major or minor, or WST 102 (formerly SSI/WST 102), or WST 103, or WST 301, or WST/PHI 284, or 6 credits of departmentally approved courses
Advisory prerequisites: may be announced with topic
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits
 

LGBTQ Classroom Resource

The LGBTQ Classroom Resource is designed to provide faculty members, instructors, and TAs with information about how to create an LGBTQ-friendly educational experience for students.